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Group to Brig Gen L. D. Smith, US Army

Condition: VF

Group to Brigadier General Lynn D. Smith, US Army: Army Distinguished Service Medal, slot brooch, machine-engraved “Lynn/D./Smith”; Legion of Merit, with one oak leaf cluster, wrap brooch, machine-engraved “Lynn/D./Smith”, unnumbered; Legion of Merit, one oak leaf cluster, slot brooch, machine-engraved "Lynn/D/Smith"; American Defense Service Medal, slot brooch; American Campaign Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, with arrowhead and two bronze star devices; World War II Victory Medal; Army Occupation Medal, with clasp “Japan”; National Defense Service Medal; Korean Service Medal; Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal; United Nations Korea Medal. Plus, a clutch-back ribbon bar set (without the Distinguished Service Medal and with the ribbon for an Army Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters) With approximately 100 pages of photocopied service records and efficiency reports.

Brigadier General Smith was an industrial engineer by training, earning a degree from the University of Southern California in 1929. He worked for the Metropolitan Water Board of Northern California, supervising heavy construction projects, such as dams and tunnels. Commissioned into the Coast Artillery Reserve in 1929, he was called to active duty in October 1940 as a Plans and Operations Officer, 9th Coast Artillery District. After three other staff positions, he moved to the Alaska Defense Command, seeing action at Attu and becoming the Chief of Staff of the Army Task Force occupying Kiska. After a term as a student and instructor at the Army-Navy Staff College, he became the operations officer, Tenth Army, taking part in the Okinawa and Ryukus campaigns. In 1947, he became an operations staff officer in Japan, taking part in the early operations in Korea. As General MacArthur’s representative, Smith briefed the Joint Chiefs of Staff on the Inchon Landing the day before it happened. MacArthur had instructed Smith to take his time returning to Washington so the JCS could not intervene to stop the operation. In 1958, he was assigned to be the J-3 of American Land Forces in Lebanon. Smith was then assigned to duties in the Department of the Army, retiring in 1964 as a brigadier general. The DSM and Legion of Merit are illustrated in Fred Borch’s “Medals for Soldiers and Airmen: Awards and Decorations of the Army and Air Force”.
 

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Group to C.R. Cleveland, 32nd Division

Condition: VF

Group of three to Charles R. Cleveland: Purple Heart, slot brooch, numbered “331767”, hand-engraved “Charles R./Cleveland”; Saginaw, Michigan, World War I Service Medal, engraved “Charles Cleveland”; France Verdun Medal, Vernier design.

Cleveland (1895-1952) is buried in Saginaw, Michigan. His World War I service was with the 32nd Division. 
 

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Group to Carroll J. Blaney, USN/USA

Condition: VF

Group of 7 to CMC1 Carroll J. Blaney, US Navy/US Army: Purple Heart, slot brooch, unnamed, unnumbered; Army Good Conduct Medal, slot brooch, unnamed; Navy Good Conduct Medal, wrap brooch, with bar “Second Award”, hand-engraved “Carroll/Joseph/Blaney/1940"; American Defense Service Medal, with “A” device on the ribbon and bar “Fleet”; American Campaign Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, with 3 stars; World War II Victory Medal. With a crimp brooch Army Good Conduct Medal, machine-engraved "Carroll J.Blaney", with a note in Blaney's hand "Received 2/11/89/Over 25 Years Late!"

Blaney enlisted in the Navy in 1936, serving aboard USS Indianapolis. In September 1941, he was aboard USS Griffin (AS-13), a submarine tender in the Atlantic Fleet. Immediately after Pearl Harbor, Griffin was ordered to the Pacific, where she remained for the duration of the war. In December 1944, Blaney had been aboard USS Petrof Bay (CVE-80) for nearly a year and was transferred ashore to a receiving ship awaiting assignment to new construction. His enlistment being up, Blaney apparently joined the Army, retiring in the mid-1950s. His headstone at Arlington National Cemetery shows the award of a Purple Heart, although the basis for the award is not mentioned in any of his Navy muster roll entries, nor is he listed in the published roll of Navy casualties in World War II, so the Purple Heart may stem from his Army service. Blaney’s full Navy and Army record file should be in the National Archives at St. Louis. Blaney was from Baltimore.

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Group to Franklin Kaefer, US Army

Condition: VF

Group of three: Purple Heart, slot brooch, unnamed, unnumbered; New York Conspicuous Service Cross, numbered "14844", marked "Sterling", clutch-back; Veterans of Foreign Wars convention abdge, with "Committee" bar, imprinted "28th Annual/Encampment/Dept of Mass/Veters/of Foreign Wars/June 17-20, 1948/Springfield, Mass". With a three-place ribbon bar (Army Good Conduct; American Defense Service and Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medals), and a set of Masonic cufflinks and tie bar.

The Conspicuous Service Cross was awarded to Sergeant Kaefer on 11 January 1968 in Williamsville, New York. He served in the Army from April 1939 through July 1945.  Kaefer was born in Buffalo and died in November 1989 and is buried in Cowlesville, New York.

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Group to Henry Tomlin, USAAF/USMC

Condition: VF

Group of seven to Henry N. Tomlin, Jr., Air Corps and US Marine Corps:  Air Medal, with 2 oak leaf clusters, machine-engraved "Henry N. Tomlin, Jr."; Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, with one star on the ribbon, unnamed; Army Good Conduct Medal, unnamed; American Campaign Medal; Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal, with 3 bronze stars on the ribbon; World War II Victory Medal; National Defense Service Medal. All are mounted for wear on a clutch-back bar. Some age and wear to the ribbons. With photocopied research and service records.

Tomlin served with the 389th Bomb Group (B-24s, RAF Hethel), receiving his three Air Medals in early 1945, when the group was supporting ground operations after the Battle of the Bulge and the airborne crossing of the Rhine River. In 1949, Tomlin enlisted in the Marine Corps, serving initially in an Amphibian Tractor Battalion. In 1950, he trained as an aircraft mechanic and served in Japan and at Cherry Point and Quantico. Rising to the rank of technical sergeant, he left the Marine Corps in 1962.  Originally from Norfolk, Virginia, Tomlin died in Prescott, Arizona, in January 2005.

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Navy group of 6 for Vietnam service

Condition: VF

Navy group of 6 medals:  Navy Commendation Medal, with "V" device; Navy Good Conduct Medal, unnamed, with two stars on the ribbon; National Defense Service Medal (hole in the ribbon where a device has been attached); Vietnam Service Medal, with 2 bronze stars; Republic of Vietnam Technical Service Medal, first class (Vietnamese-made); Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal, with "1960- " device (US-made).  Bar-mounted for wear.

The recipient was apparently commissioned prior to his service in Vietnam, as the Technical Service Medal, first class, was only awarded to officers.

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Pair to Harry Lunney, 26th Division

Condition: VF

Pair of medals to Harry J. Lunney, 101st Infantry, 26th Division: Purple Heart, hand-engraved “Harry J. Lunney”, numbered “12665"; Brookline, Massachusetts, Mexican Border Service Medal, engraved “Harry J. Lunney” on the reverse. The Purple Heart shows very light age, the Brookline medal has a very worn ribbon and the brooch is missing. Cook Harry J. Lunney, Machine Gun Company, 101st Infantry, 26th Division, was wounded in action on 24 October 1918. This Purple Heart was approved on 13 August 1932. Lunney enlisted in the National Guard in June 1916 and served through April 1919. He is not on the roll for a federal Mexican Border Service Medal. Lunney died in November 1959.

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